2016 Annual Karl Barth Conference


Karl Barth’s Pneumatology and the Global Pentecostal Movement

Karl Barth’s pneumatology is a contentious subject, especially when read in critical relationship to his conception of divine and human agency and his consequent understanding of the church. But how might Barth’s pneumatological contribution be interpreted in another ecclesiological context, and against another set of concerns regarding the acting of God in relation to the human? This conference sets Barth’s work within the context of world Pentecostalism and examines the potential of his pneumatology for a God wondrous and beyond all controls, and for the church as a pilgrim people gathered and send by the Spirit to witness to this God.

Registration

Registration for the 2016 Annual Karl Barth Conference is now open, and can be accessed here. Please follow all instructions carefully, especially if you are registering for lodging at Erdman Center. If you have any questions or issues with registration, please use the “Email Registration Assistance” at the bottom of the registration page, or email Ivette Martell at ivette.martell@ptsem.edu.

Registration Rate:

$245 - includes meals Monday - Wednesday

Students (Non-PTS Students):

$50 - does not include meals

Princeton Seminary and Princeton University Students, Staff, and Faculty:

Free - no meals included

Banquet (optional):

The conference banquet takes place on Sunday evening and marks the opening of the annual Karl Barth conference. All registrants are welcome to attend for a cost of $30. Business-causal dress. Please note: You cannot sign up for the banquet meal when you arrive at the conference. You must register for the banquet meal prior to the conference.

Registration Button

Call for Papers

The 2016 Annual Karl Barth Conference will be held on June 19th – 22nd, 2016 at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, NJ. The conference’s theme examines “Karl Barth’s Pneumatology and the Global Pentecostal Movement”. Plenary speakers include: Daniela Augustine (Lee University), Christian T. Collins Winn (Bethel University), Terry Cross (Lee University), Jessica DeCou (Princeton Theological Seminary), John Flett (Pilgrim Theological College), Darrell Guder (Princeton Theological Seminary), Michael McClymond (Saint Louis University), Frank Macchia (Vanguard University of Southern California), Paul Nimmo (University of Aberdeen), Nimi Wariboko (Boston University), and Michael Welker (Heidelberg University).

Those currently enrolled in a doctoral program or with completed doctorates are invited to submit paper proposals on this year’s theme. We invite papers which set Karl Barth’s life and work into constructive conversation with global Pentecostalism. We especially encourage women, people of color, international students, and new voices in the Barth discussion to submit proposals.

Abstracts not exceeding 250 words should be sent to barth.center@ptsem.edu no later than March 1st, 2016. Papers should be no more than 3,500 words in order to be delivered in 30 minutes and allow 15-20 minutes for Q&A. Please include your current academic standing with submissions.

Schedule

This schedule is preliminary and subject to extensive change and revision as the conference nears.

Sunday, June 19th, 2016

2:00 – 5:00 PM – Registration (Erdman Center)

6:00 – 7:30 PM – Opening Banquet (Mackay Dining Hall)

7:30 – 9:00 PM – Michael Welker: The Spirit and Creation (Stuart Hall 6)

Monday, June 20th, 2016

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Breakfast (Mackay Dining Hall)

9:00 – 10:00 AM – Nimi Warikobo: The Spirit and Ethics (Stuart Hall 6)

10:15 – 10:45 AM – Break (Coffee available in Stuart Hall basement)

11:00 – Noon – Jessica DeCou: The Spirit and Spirituality (Stuart Hall 6)

Noon – 1:00 PM – Lunch

1:00 – 1:30 PM – Worship Service - Darrell Guder, preacher (Miller Chapel)

2:00 – 3:00 – Christian Collins Winn: Karl Barth, Eschatology and Pietism (Stuart Hall 6)

3:00 – 3:30 – Break (Coffee and refreshments available in Stuart Hall basement)

3:30 – 4:30 – Concurrent Session I

  • Samantha Fong - Stuart Hall 1
  • David Bradnick - Stuart Hall 2
  • Tim Hartman - Stuart Hall 3
  • Ben Rhodes - Stuart Hall 4

5:30 – 6:30 – Open Dinner in Princeton

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

8:00 – 9:00 AM - Breakfast (Mackay Dining Hall)

9:00 – 10:00 AM – Frank Macchia: Christ and the Spirit (Stuart Hall 6)

10:15 – 10:45 AM – Break (Coffee available in Stuart Hall basement)

11:00 – Noon – Daniela Augustine: ‘The Ever-coming’ Spirit: Eastern-European Pentecostal Reflections on Christoformation and Barth’s Eschatological Pneumatology (Stuart Hall 6)

Noon – 1:00 PM—Lunch (Mackay Dining Hall)

1:00 – 1:30 PM – Worship Service - Darrell Guder, preacher (Miller Chapel)

2:00 – 3:00 – John G. Flett: Evil, Demons, and Exorcism (Stuart Hall 6)

3:00 – 3:30 – Break (Coffee and refreshments are available in Stuart Hall basement)

3:30 – 4:30 – Concurrent Session II

  • Daniel McDowell - Stuart Hall 1
  • Michael O’Neil - Stuart Hall 2
  • David Chao - Stuart Hall 3
  • Joshua Ziefle - Stuart Hall 4

5:30 – 6:30 - Dinner (Mackay Dining Hall)

7:00 – 8:00 – Evening Event in the Library Atrium (Seminary Library)

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

8:00 – 9:00 AM - Breakfast (Mackay Dining Hall)

9:00 – 10:00 AM – Michael McClymond: How the Spirit in Barth Pertains to the Work of Christ (Stuart Hall 6)

10:00 – 11:00 AM – Break – Check out from the Erdman Center by 11 AM (Coffee available in the Stuart Hall basement)

11:00 – Noon – Concluding Dialogue between Paul Nimmo and Terry Cross (Stuart Hall 6)

Noon – 1:00 PM – Lunch (Mackay Dining Hall)

Speaker Profiles

Suggested Readings

Suggested Readings for the 2016 Karl Barth Conference entitled “Karl Barth’s Pneumatology and the Global Pentecostal Movement”:

I. Readings on Pentecostalism and Pneumatology:

Anderson, Allan H. An Introduction to Pentecostalism: Global Charismatic Christianity. 2nd edition. In Introduction to Religion Series. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Augustine, Daniela C. “Pentecost and Prosperity in Eastern Europe: Between Sharing of Possessions and Accumulating Personal Wealth,” in Amos Yong and Katy Attanasi, eds. Pentecostalism and Prosperity: The Socio-Economics of Global Renewal (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).

_____________________. “The Empowered Church: Ecclesiological Dimensions of the Event of Pentecost,” in Toward a Pentecostal Ecclesiology: The Church and the Fivefold Gospel. John Christopher Thomas, ed., (Cleveland, TN: CPT Press, 2010), 157-180.

Johns, Cheryl Bridges. “The Holy Spirit: Meeting God in the Margins.” Source: The Living Pulpit, 5 no 1 (Jan - Mar 1996), p 26-27.

_____________________. “When All God’s People are Prophets: Acts and the Task of Missional Preaching.” Source: Journal for Preachers, 22 no 4 Pentecost (1999), p 16-21.

Chung, Meehyun. “Korean Pentecostalism and the Preaching of Prosperity” Zeitschrift für Missionswissenschaft und Religionwissenschaft. Heft 304, 99 (Jahrgang 2015).

Dempster, Murray W., Byron Klaus, and Douglas Peterson, eds. The Globalization of Pentecostalism: A Religion Made to Travel. Irvine, CA: Regnum Books International,1999.

Yong, Amos. The Spirit Poured out on All Flesh: Pentecostalism and the Possibility of Global Theology. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic Press, 2005.

II. Readings on Barth, Pneumatology and Pentecostals

Busch, Eberhard. “The Prevailing Spirit—Pneumatology.” In The Great Passion: An Introduction to Karl Barth’s Theology. Translated by Geoffrey W. Bromiley. Edited and Annotated by Darrell L. Guder and Judith J. Guder. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2004.

Cross, Terry L. “Christ in Us: The Hope of Glory or the Sentimentality of a ‘Bohemian Private Enterprise?’ Barth, Pietists, and Pentecostals.” In Karl Barth and the Future of Evangelical Theology. Edited by Christian T. Collins Winn and John L. Drury. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, Publishers, 2014.

Hunsinger, George . “The Mediator of Communion: Karl Barth’s Doctrine of the Holy Spirit (1999).” In Disruptive Grace: Studies in the Theology of Karl Barth. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2000. [Also in The Cambridge Companion to Karl Barth. Edited by John Webster. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000.]

Macchia, Frank D. “The Spirit of God and the Spirit of Life: An Evangelical Response to Karl Barth’s Pneumatology. In Karl Barth and Evangelical Theology: Convergences and Divergences. Edited by Sung Wook Chung. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2006.

Rosato, Philip J. The Spirit as Lord: The Pneumatology of Karl Barth. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1981.

Concurrent Speakers

Maps and Directions

By Air

From Newark Liberty International Airport

The Olympic Airporter shuttle service takes you to the Nassau Inn in Princeton; call for schedule and reservations: 800.822.9797 (within the United States) or 732.938.6666 (outside the United States), or visit www.olympicairporter.com

The AirTrain takes you from all airport terminals to the Newark Liberty International Airport Train Station. Take New Jersey Transit southbound (Northeast Corridor Line) trains to Princeton Junction. From Princeton Junction take the train to Princeton Station.

From Philadelphia International Airport

Take the R1 High Speed Rail Line (entrance on pedestrian bridges and commercial roadway), limousine service (The Olympic Airporter; call for reservations: 800.822.9797 within the United States or 732.938.6666 outside the United States, or visit www.olympicairporter.com), or local taxi service to 30th Street Station in Philadelphia, where you can purchase a SEPTA/New Jersey Transit ticket to take a SEPTA train to Trenton and a New Jersey Transit train to Princeton Junction. From Princeton Junction take the train to Princeton Station.

By Bus

From Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City (41st Street and 8th Avenue)

Purchase a Suburban Transit bus ticket to Princeton at windows 16 through 19 on the first floor. Board the bus on the third floor (fourth level) at gates 420 through 422. The bus leaves every half hour between 6:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. on weekdays and between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. on weekends, and every half hour on the hour until 1:00 a.m. The trip is one and one-half hours. Ask the driver to let you off at the end of Nassau Street where it meets Mercer Street and Route 206 in Princeton, and walk to the Seminary.By

By Train

From New York City (and north) and Philadelphia (and south)

New Jersey Transit services Princeton from the north (New York City, Newark), with connecting service from the south (Trenton, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC). Amtrak trains stop in Trenton, and some at Princeton Junction.

By Car

From the North/New York City

Take the New Jersey Turnpike South to Exit 9 (New Brunswick). After the tollbooths, bear right onto the ramp for Route 18 North. Shortly after getting onto Route 18 North the road will fork; stay to the left of the fork, in the right lane. Bear right onto this exit for Route 1 South/Trenton. Follow Route 1 South to Alexander Road (Princeton). Turn right onto Alexander Road and continue to the entrance of Princeton Seminary, which is the first left turn after College Road (Alexander Road will be Alexander Street at this point).

From the West

Take I-78 East into New Jersey. Exit onto I-287 South toward Somerville. Follow signs for Routes 202/206 South. Travel south on 202 for a short distance and then follow signs for Route 206 South. You will go around a traffic circle. Continue south on Route 206 for about eighteen miles to Nassau Street (Route 27) in the center of Princeton. Turn left onto Nassau Street and the first right onto Mercer Street and continue to the main entrance of Princeton Seminary, which will be on your left.

From the South

From southern New Jersey take I-295 North (becomes I-95 South) to the “Princeton Pike North” exit and continue on Princeton Pike for approximately five miles. Immediately after passing Library Place (on the left), the main entrance to the campus will be on your right.

From the East

Take I-95 West toward Trenton to the exit for I-295 North (becomes I-95 South) to the “Princeton Pike North” exit and continue on Princeton Pike for approximately five miles. Immediately after passing Library Place (on the left), the main entrance to the campus will be on your right.

From Philadelphia

Take I-95 North into New Jersey and exit at “Princeton Pike North” and continue on Princeton Pike for approximately five miles. Immediately after passing Library Place (on the left), the main entrance to the campus will be on your right.

Princeton Seminary Main Campus

A detailed map of Princeton Theological Seminary is shown below.

Detailed Map of Princeton Theological Seminary
Detailed Map of Princeton Theological Seminary

Lodging

All rooms at Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Center are now full.

We have reserved a limited number of rooms at the nearby Clarion Hotel Palmer Inn. Rooms are $73 per evening. The hotel offers a shuttle bus to downtown Princeton and the Tiger Transit system has a pickup stop one block away. Please mention the 2016 Karl Barth Conference room block when making your reservation. If you’d like to reserve a room, here’s more information:

Clarion Hotel Palmer Inn
3499 Route 1 South
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
(609) 452-2500

Contact

If you have any questions or concerns, email us at barth.center@ptsem.edu or call us at 609-524-1981.